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Symmetry Interactive Notebook

13 Mar

January and February felt like the same as always. Very long and very stressful. Then, March arrived and it seemed like Spring was truly on the way. Whammo! One last hurrah at winter. Another day with barely half a class and the sad knowledge that you will get to teach the same lesson twice. Sigh. At least, the incredibly fast meltdown brings a bit of happiness … as well as mud and blacktop recess. Feeling like we’re back to the “fortunately/unfortunately…” post:-)

Guess what we are saying is that we are just doing our best to hang on until March Break! This year, we plan to vacation with our families together in a warmer climate. Our children are very excited about the prospect of being together for a week – which they could have done at home as well but, at least they’ll have better weather! Whatever you have planned for your break, take some time for yourself and relax. To help you further decompress, we have you covered with another freebie. Enjoy.


The following freebie is an interactive notebook entry on symmetry. Our expectation is that students are able to sort polygons by lines of symmetry as well as rotational symmetry.

You can find this file on our downloads page or you can download a copy here:

Symmetry INB Brownlee and Belangerr


Open Response and Math

23 Sep

Over the summer, one of us read way too many math focussed books and not enough fiction.  Then, not content with just reading the books, she often decided that she had to make some organizers to go with the math text.  As Dr. Marian Small is a math guru, she decided to start with her work. Turns out Dr. Small has way more books than anticipated! Anyway, long and boring story cut short, Dr. Marian Small’s Good Questions: Great Ways to Differentiate Mathematics Instruction was a (relatively) more interesting read and offered some great ideas for math instruction. These included:

  • Turning around a question
  • Asking for similarities and differences
  • Asking for a number sentence
  • Replacing a number with a blank
  • Changing the question

Turning around a question, has the teacher give the answer while the students create the problem or number sentence. Asking for similarities and differences, allows students to discuss how items or concepts are alike or different (pretty self-explanatory concept really!). In asking for a number sentence, students are asked to create sentences that include certain words and numbers.

Now that we are back to school, the studious one of us is regretting her poor judgement in frittering away her time on thoughtful tasks. Her sister very nicely sorted out a stack of mysteries for her to read but did she complete that pile? Noooo. Well, her loss is your gain. If you are interested, below are organizers that will help you use these concepts in your classroom.

Now, go! Find a good mystery to read before it’s too late.


Download the file here: Open Math Questions Student Response BLM Brownlee and Belanger