Archive | Foldable RSS feed for this section

Media Literacy Foldable

11 Dec

The craziness of the winter season is upon us at school! We’re doing all we can to keep our kids and academics on track while they are already focussed on the break. Add in preparing for a Christmas concert (yes, ours is still a Christmas concert) and all the holiday related interruptions and the day can seem excessively long and tiring.  As well, the other day there seemed to be a lot of supply teachers in so either everyone was taking a fun day and we didn’t get the memo or there is a nasty bug going around. Again. Good times. Good, good times.

When we think about it, there is rarely a time when there isn’t some stressor or a three-ring circus kind of day. There is always something. We can’t remember the last time we heard a colleague say they felt caught up and well rested. Maybe because they see the rest of us and know they would be universally despised or because we, as a general group, tend to feel we should always be doing more and focus on what needs to be done.

As always, our goal is to help you lessen your stress and help out where we can. We’ve noticed media literacy is a popular category in our stats so we decided to post our recently created media literacy foldable. We looked at the 5 key concepts of media literacy so we used the media triangle to create our foldable.

We also hope you take some time over the holidays to reflect not on what you need to do but what you have done well. It’s not as easy but would be good for the teaching soul. Happy Holidays!

You can download the file here:

Media Literacy INB brownlee and belanger

Advertisements

(T)Each Day is a New Adventure

25 Nov

Interactive Notebooks in Math (Patterning and Number Sense)

20 Oct

Inquiry Process – Thick and Thin Questions

8 Aug

This year we are excited to partner up with another class to strengthen our inquiry skills. Inquiry is integral in our curriculum yet it seems like our students struggle with key components. We always worry that maybe we take away the scaffolding a little too quickly – such as the time we realized our students didn’t really get that Google was search engine instead of a website. That’s a whole other discussion! Anyway, we ended up reading the book IQ: A Practical Guide to Inquiry-Based Learning – based on a Facebook recommendation, of course

Image result for IQ inquiry book

Yea FB friends, as it is an excellent source of ideas and we are looking forward to trying many of the activities!!

While we recognize the inquiry process isn’t really a linear procedure we decided to segment it into smaller steps as our class will be responsible for supporting the younger students. Our hope is that breaking it down into “steps” will make them more mindful of their own part in the process. (Can you tell we’ve been talking about metacognition too?).

We want to start with a look at our focus and then move into a discussion on thin and thick questions (this will also tie in nicely with Language Arts). To help out we want them to keep the definition and examples of thick and thin questions in their notebooks. We have seen sandwiches, burgers and mustaches all used as a visual for thick and thin but we ended up using the mustache example. Would have been perfect for last year’s mustache theme – too bad we’re using superheroes this year Going to admit we’re still trying to think of a way to make a superhero visual on this one!

 

 

We tend to have ones already completed for students who may have some fine motor concerns

We think we will also discuss how to use a Q-Chart at the same time. We have found thin questions are popular because they are quick and easy. Hopefully, by the end of the year, we will have them more comfortable with creating thick questions and recognizing not every question has a “right” answer.

For anyone looking for a thick and thin questions template, you can use the one here. A small Q-chart is also in the document.

Reading and Inquiry INB Thick and Thin Questions BLM Brownlee and Belanger

Writing Process: TAPF

19 Jul

Thinking about our goals for this coming year, we started to think about ways to revise our language program. This year we decided we are going to incorporate an interactive language notebook. While we aren’t totally certain if we are going to use separate ones for reading, word study and writing or just one general notebook, we started with a focus on writing.

This year we are going to start with a Topic, Audience, Purpose, Format approach. It seems straightforward and student friendly. Also, after several years of reading “so, yeah” in formal writing we are hoping enough focus on the audience piece might help eliminate that problem! If you haven’t encountered students randomly writing “so, yeah” in every genre, especially when they run out of things to say, then consider yourself lucky!

We decided after our introductory classes we would start with this foldable for our books.

Using a 4-section foldable, students will label the outside flap with the letters TAPF. Inside they will write out the title and definitions for each section.

We will do follow up lessons on each topic before using format to start our first focus on recount.  As we work through other revisions we will continue to share some ideas and activities. So, yeah. Enjoy.